Posting it on the web is the ghost of “done”, so:

An Ancient Egyptian game.  I’ve been looking at Ancient Egyptian Ars for quite a while, and I’ve never really been able to find the time to assemble it as an alt setting. I don’t want to do it as a hard precursor setting (no Aegis, different names for the arts, different ways of gaining arts and all that jazz.) I’d like to just port the rules across.

A game set in Mali.

A campaign setting for Ars in which a random people start doing magic without training.  They can’t laern new tricks, save that stressful situations (adventures) give them dreams in which they see symbols which become spell-like abilities. The deep background ofthis is that the Diedne, like all druids, believed in reincarnation, and that something has happened which is allowing Diedne souls to come back, and have some aptitude for magic, but no memory of their previous lives.

A non-Ars game based on the life of John Fortune, who made his (heh) fortune by stealing the cumquat from China, and was then sent back to steal the technologies of tea making.  Its a botanical Indiana Jones story.  I may need to sci-fi it, to file the serial numbers off.

An historical pirates game.  One where priates don’t talk like Robert Newton. Possibly Ars?  Could work.  I like the Aztecs as Diedne-influenced blood magic practioners.

Advertisements

4 replies on “RPGs I’d write if I had more time

    1. Mali is about to rise to prominence as a city state in west Africa in th standard Ars Magica time period, so its possible I could convert it to a paid gig, which is always nice. 8) That aside the native magic there is interesting. There are sorcerer kings in the Mali folkstories, and they use an interesting style of magic. One, for example, has a sort of magical gamalan (musical percusion keyboard instrument) tha the uses to pull a Sauron on the people of surronding kingdoms. That’s a new sort of flavor for Ars, and wouldn’t disrupt the core setting too much to add.

      So, its a mizture of it being of itself, interesting, having material available in English, and it being theoretically commercializable.

      Like

  1. I was looking at trade routes of ancient Europe, and read a little about the trans-saharan trade route. Since before Roman times, slaves and salt would come north across the desert.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trans-Saharan_trade

    I also read in a book about salt (an interesting enough topic, seeing as how salt is a major trade good throughout history and vital for preserving food for winter) that the Kingdom of Mali had a city made of salt – they mined salt from the surface, and used salt bricks as building material. In Ars, a salt city could be truly fantastical.

    Thinking of trade routes of ancient Europe, I was trying to come up with stuff for roman/ early post-roman magical roleplaying, and I wanted a resource map to use for trade routes or for vis sources. I couldn’t find decent Italian or Greek ones, but did find a really good Egyptian one for Roman Egypt, and uncovered the fact that Egypt’s emerald mine appears to be the oldest in the world. I was looking at it from a semi-hard precursor setting viewpoint – some Ars stuff existed with magic societies (to be later “recovered” by Bonisagus), others didn’t. It’s sort of a mess.

    Like

    1. I can confirm that the Egyptian emerald mine was considered the oldest in the world. There was one in the Alps used by the Romans, but in 1220 no-one is sure where it was. 8)

      I know the book about salt, I think. The interesting question in Ars, of course, is that given Africa is cut off just north of the Equator, where is all of this stuff coming from? I think the best way, of you want a mundane explanation, is to posit some city states along the south coast, near the boiling sea.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s